New smart band to speed up the recovery process

New smart band to speed up the recovery process

This smart pandemic, which even detects corona, includes pressure sensors, temperature sensors and communication tags, and can send data to a health center via mobile phone.
Patients with open wounds, such as bed sores or wounds, or need regular care to determine how well they are healing. This may require regular visits to the doctor’s office, but patients may not need more visits thanks to a new smart band developed by IEEE Fellow Ravinder Dahiya and other researchers at the University of Glasgow. Dahia works with the University Sensing Technologies Department.
The flexible bandage measures about 3 cm by 6 cm and can be used to apply pressure to the wound to help the wound heal.
This is the first dressing to use sensors that simultaneously measure the amount of pressure applied to the patient’s skin and temperature, which can affect the healing process. The dressing can be sent to a healthcare provider using a smartphone app developed by researchers.
Repair monitoring is not the only potential use of the program, Dahia says dressings can be used to monitor breathing and even detect the symptoms of Covid 19. Researchers believe that temperature and pressure are two parameters that are difficult to combine to assess wounds.
Combined wounds are used to accelerate the healing process A variety of methods are used, including the use of skin substitutes for hard wounds as well as electronic devices with piezoelectric materials for dressing-based On the treatment and negative pressure that increases blood flow and at the same time keeps the wound moist.
“A pressure bandage that just puts the right pressure on can speed recovery, but understanding the right pressure and how to control body temperature was a challenge,” says Dahia. Studies show that cleft palate improves better at temperatures between 36 and 38 ° C.
The semi-transparent adhesive dressing uses two types of sensors and a battery-free NFC tag. One sensor monitors the patient’s temperature while the other sensor monitors how much pressure is applied to the skin. A transparent siloxane-like polydiphyde is used to make the pressure sensor. PDMS is the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer because of its versatility.
The researchers found that the pressure sensor could accurately measure the pressure for the band Determine the pressure and the temperature sensor can detect that the patient’s fever is rising and therefore may be infected.

Other applications

Dahia says smart dressings can also be used to check the lung function of people with respiratory illnesses such as asthma, as well as devices that use the respiratory tract. When the label is placed on the patient’s chest, the pressure sensor can detect irregular breathing. He tested his theory using a mannequin in the respiratory tract
“The label can even be used to help diagnose cases of coronavirus,” he said. Because the two main symptoms of Covid 19 are shortness of breath and fever. This smart app can immediately notify a healthcare provider to expedite testing and possibly prevent other patients from becoming infected.
The dressing has been tested in a laboratory, and its Behavioral Readiness (TRL) level is around 5, Dahia said. The TRL system used to assess the maturity of a technology has levels that can be increased to 9, a rating of 5 means that the technology can be tested outside the laboratory.
Dahia says smart dressings can be used by anyone, especially front-line workers. They are the people who need it the most.